Welcome

OASIES is an interdisciplinary community of graduate students and scholars in the New York metropolitan area who promote the study of Inner Eurasia, broadly construed. Our goal is to foster dialogue and partnership across the academic spaces bounded by East Asian, Middle Eastern, South Asian, and Russian area studies paradigms. Founded in 2008 at Columbia University, our organization is now a broad consortium that includes representatives from New York University and Princeton University. We strive to cultivate a sense of scholarly community by organizing and sponsoring lectures, film screenings, conferences, and other events during the course of the academic year.

**Announcements**

The Organization for the Advancement of Studies of Inner Eurasian Societies presents

INNER EURASIA THEN & NOW: LEGACIES OF THOUGHT, SPACE, AND EMPIRE

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2015

Richard Ettinghausen Library, Hagop Kevorkian Center | NYU

 

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

 

OPENING RECEPTION

9:30 – 10:00 AM

 

PANEL ONE

10:00 AM – 11:15 AM

 

Construction of Intersecting Identities

Chair: Abby Amanda Downing-Beaver (Harriman Institute, Columbia University)

Discussant: Gulnar Kendirbai (Adjunct Assistant Professor of History, Columbia University)

 

Clayton Merkley  (Slavic Department, Columbia University), “Kazakhs into Cossacks? Efforts to Assimilate Central Asians into the Russian Empire”

Hamed Kazemzadeh (Center for East European Studies, University of Warsaw), “Formation of National Identity Among Caucasian Nations in Confrontation with Persian, Ottoman and Russian Identities During the 18th and 19th Centuries”

Zhumatay Gabit (Harriman Institute, Columbia University), “The Sovietization of Kazakhstan and its Consequences, 1920-1930s”

 

COFFEE BREAK

11:15 AM – 11:30 AM

 

PANEL TWO

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM

 

Museums, Monuments, and Memory

Chair: Christopher Edling (School of the Arts, Columbia University)

 

Rustin Zarkar (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, New York University), “Monuments, Memory, and the Politics of National Delimitation in Uzbekistan”

Aura Young (Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale University), “Orhan Pamuk’s The Museum of Innocence: Novel and Museum on the Border Between West and East”

Shima Houshyar (Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies, New York University), “Museumization of Occupation and Civilizational Discourse as Nation-building in Georgia”

 

 

LUNCH BREAK

12:45 – 2:00 PM

 

PANEL THREE

2:00 – 3:15 PM

 

Religion and Transnational Connections

Chair: Belle Cheves (Near Eastern Studies, New York University)

 

Serkan Yolacan (Cultural Anthropology, Duke University), “A Seesaw Across the Black Sea: Turkish-Azeri Encounters in Old Frontiers”

Ilke Denizli (School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University), “From Prestige to Scrutiny: Reevaluating the Success of ‘Turkish Schools’ in Central Asia”

Marintha Miles (Department of Anthropology, George Washington University), “Switching to Satr: an Ethnography of the Particular in Women’s Choices in Head Coverings in Tajikistan”

 

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

3:15 – 4:00 PM

 

Shoshana Keller is a Professor of History at Hamilton College. She focuses on Soviet and Central Asian History and has written on the Stalinist campaign against Islam, women and women’s education, and the creation of Soviet Uzbek history. Keller is the author of To Moscow, Not Mecca (Praeger Publishers, 2001) and most recently an essay on the origins of coerced child labor in Uzbekistan’s cotton fields.

 

CLOSING RECEPTION

4:00 – 5:00 PM

 

Thank you to our sponsors and conference volunteers.

 The Harriman Institute at Columbia University

The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University

Conference Committee:

 

Ilke Denizli (School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University), Belle Cheves (Near Eastern Studies, New York University), Lauren Bisio (Harriman Institute, Columbia University), Chris Edling (School of the Arts, Columbia University), Casey Michel (Harriman Institute, Columbia University), and Holly Myers (Department of Slavic Languages, Columbia University).